Overnight No-Cook Banana Oatmeal

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Overnight No-Cook Banana Oatmeal

For a weekday morning rush, you’ll be glad you prepared this American, Simple Cooking with Heart breakfast recipe the evening before. Or, let your child take the reins and mix the oatmeal together.

Ingredients

Servings  4  

  • 2 1/2 cup skim milk
  • 1 Tbsp. honey
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 3 1/2 cups rolled oats (not instant or quick-cooking)
  • 2 bananas, halved lengthwise and sliced
  • 1/4 cup chopped, unsalted pecans or walnuts

Directions

Tip: Click on step to mark as complete.

  1. In a large, re-sealable container or bowl, add milk, honey, and extract. Stir to combine, adding oats and stirring to combine. Seal or cover; place in the refrigerator and let it sit overnight.
  2. The next day, peel each banana. Halve each one lengthwise and slice. Divide sliced bananas and nuts over each oatmeal portion. Serve.

Cooking Tip: Play around with the combination of oats to milk ratio. Like an oatmeal with a thicker consistency? Use more oats. Prefer it liquidy? Go higher on the milk.

Keep it Healthy: Add a variety of goodies into the oatmeal when preparing it the night before like dried fruit, unsweetened coconut, pumpkin seeds, flax seeds, chia seeds, etc. Chopped fresh fruit, like bananas, go brown if added the night before; it’s best to top with fresh fruit right before eating.

Tip: Baking raw, dry oats for 1 hour at 250F can help make sure foods are safe and prevent food-born illnesses.

Tip: Natural sweeteners such as maple syrup or honey are a great way to add a touch of sweetness instead of sugar. Even a little bit of fruit juice like orange juice can provide sweetness.

Nutrition Facts

Overnight No-Cook Banana Oatmeal

CaloriesCalories

443 Per Serving

ProteinProtein

18g Per Serving

FiberFiber

10g Per Serving

Cost Per ServingCost Per Serving

$1.88

Nutrition Facts

Calories 443
Total Fat 9.7 g
Saturated Fat 1.4 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 3.2 g
Monounsaturated Fat 4.2 g
Cholesterol 3 mg
Sodium 68 mg
Total Carbohydrate 74 g
Dietary Fiber 10 g
Sugars 21 g
Protein 18 g

Dietary Exchanges
3 starch, 1 fat-free milk, 1 fruit

Copyright © 2018 American Heart Association, Healthy for Good™. Every purchase helps fund the work of the AHA/ASA.

For a weekday morning rush, you’ll be glad you prepared this American, Simple Cooking with Heart breakfast recipe the evening before. Or, let your child take the reins and mix the oatmeal together.

Nutrition Facts

Overnight No-Cook Banana Oatmeal

CaloriesCalories

443 Per Serving

ProteinProtein

18g Per Serving

FiberFiber

10g Per Serving

Cost Per ServingCost Per Serving

$1.88
×
Calories 443
Total Fat 9.7 g
Saturated Fat 1.4 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 3.2 g
Monounsaturated Fat 4.2 g
Cholesterol 3 mg
Sodium 68 mg
Total Carbohydrate 74 g
Dietary Fiber 10 g
Sugars 21 g
Protein 18 g

Dietary Exchanges
3 starch, 1 fat-free milk, 1 fruit

Ingredients

Servings  4  

  • 2 1/2 cup skim milk
  • 1 Tbsp. honey
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 3 1/2 cups rolled oats (not instant or quick-cooking)
  • 2 bananas, halved lengthwise and sliced
  • 1/4 cup chopped, unsalted pecans or walnuts

Directions

Tip: Click on step to mark as complete.

  1. In a large, re-sealable container or bowl, add milk, honey, and extract. Stir to combine, adding oats and stirring to combine. Seal or cover; place in the refrigerator and let it sit overnight.
  2. The next day, peel each banana. Halve each one lengthwise and slice. Divide sliced bananas and nuts over each oatmeal portion. Serve.

Cooking Tip: Play around with the combination of oats to milk ratio. Like an oatmeal with a thicker consistency? Use more oats. Prefer it liquidy? Go higher on the milk.

Keep it Healthy: Add a variety of goodies into the oatmeal when preparing it the night before like dried fruit, unsweetened coconut, pumpkin seeds, flax seeds, chia seeds, etc. Chopped fresh fruit, like bananas, go brown if added the night before; it’s best to top with fresh fruit right before eating.

Tip: Baking raw, dry oats for 1 hour at 250F can help make sure foods are safe and prevent food-born illnesses.

Tip: Natural sweeteners such as maple syrup or honey are a great way to add a touch of sweetness instead of sugar. Even a little bit of fruit juice like orange juice can provide sweetness.

Cooking in Color

Cooking in Color

This digest-size recipe booklet includes 27 healthful recipes, all including fruits, vegetables, or both. Each recipe is accompanied by a vibrant photograph, and the recipes are organized by color. Also included is a fruit/veggie storage guide and a fruit/veggie equivalency guide.

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Copyright © 2018 American Heart Association, Healthy for Good™. Every purchase helps fund the work of the AHA/ASA.


American Heart Association recipes are developed or reviewed by nutrition experts and meet specific, science-based dietary guidelines and recipe criteria for a healthy dietary pattern.

Some recipes may be suitable for people who are managing diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and/or other conditions or seeking low-sodium, low-fat, low-sugar, low-cholesterol or low-calories recipes. However, this site and its services do not constitute medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always talk to your health care provider for diagnosis and treatment, including your specific dietary needs. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem or condition, please contact a qualified health care provider.

Copyright is owned or held by the American Association, Inc. (AHA), except for recipes certified by the Heart-Check recipe certification program or otherwise indicated. All rights are reserved. Permission is granted, at no cost and without need for further request, to link to or share AHA-own recipes provided that no text, ingredients or directions are altered; no substitutions are made; and proper attribution is made to the American Heart Association. See full terms of use.