Tomato Basil Soup

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Tomato Basil Soup

For just a little longer than it takes to bring a can of tomato soup to a boil, whip up this tomato soup that is much lower in sodium—and much tastier too. The addition of fresh basil bumps the flavor of this soup up a notch.

Ingredients

Servings  6   Serving Size   1 cup

  • 3 14.5-ounce cans no-salt-added diced tomatoes
  • 2 cups fat-free milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups fresh basil leaves, coarsely chopped and 2 tablespoons fresh basil leaves, minced, divided use
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

Directions

Tip: Click on step to mark as complete.

  1. In a medium saucepan, stir together the tomatoes, milk, garlic powder, pepper, and salt.
  2. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 minutes. Stir in the 1 1/2 cups basil leaves. Cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Remove the pan from the heat. Stir in the baking soda (which will make the soup foam for a minute). Using a handheld immersion blender, carefully puree the mixture until smooth. Alternatively, carefully pour the mixture into a food processor or blender, venting the lid to allow steam to escape. Working in batches, puree the soup. Ladle into bowls. Sprinkle each with 1 teaspoon minced basil.

Cooking Tip: Don’t have fresh basil? Stir in 2 teaspoons dried basil when you add the garlic powder.

Keep it Healthy: Many canned tomatoes are packed with extra sodium, so be sure to look for the no-salt-added variety.

Tip: Stirring in a touch of baking soda once the soup is off the heat helps reduce the acidity from the tomatoes—a small step that makes a big impact on the soup’s flavor.

Nutrition Facts

Tomato Basil Soup

CaloriesCalories

79 Per Serving

ProteinProtein

5g Per Serving

FiberFiber

2g Per Serving

Nutrition Facts

Calories 79
Total Fat 0.0 g
Saturated Fat 0.0 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 2 mg
Sodium 212 mg
Total Carbohydrate 14 g
Dietary Fiber 2 g
Sugars 10 g
Added Sugars 0 g
Protein 5 g

Dietary Exchanges
2 vegetable, 1/2 fat-free milk

Copyright © 2018 American Heart Association, Healthy For Good™

For just a little longer than it takes to bring a can of tomato soup to a boil, whip up this tomato soup that is much lower in sodium—and much tastier too. The addition of fresh basil bumps the flavor of this soup up a notch.

Nutrition Facts

Tomato Basil Soup

CaloriesCalories

79 Per Serving

ProteinProtein

5g Per Serving

FiberFiber

2g Per Serving
×
Calories 79
Total Fat 0.0 g
Saturated Fat 0.0 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 2 mg
Sodium 212 mg
Total Carbohydrate 14 g
Dietary Fiber 2 g
Sugars 10 g
Added Sugars 0 g
Protein 5 g

Dietary Exchanges
2 vegetable, 1/2 fat-free milk

Ingredients

Servings  6   Serving Size   1 cup

  • 3 14.5-ounce cans no-salt-added diced tomatoes
  • 2 cups fat-free milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups fresh basil leaves, coarsely chopped and 2 tablespoons fresh basil leaves, minced, divided use
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

Directions

Tip: Click on step to mark as complete.

  1. In a medium saucepan, stir together the tomatoes, milk, garlic powder, pepper, and salt.
  2. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 minutes. Stir in the 1 1/2 cups basil leaves. Cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Remove the pan from the heat. Stir in the baking soda (which will make the soup foam for a minute). Using a handheld immersion blender, carefully puree the mixture until smooth. Alternatively, carefully pour the mixture into a food processor or blender, venting the lid to allow steam to escape. Working in batches, puree the soup. Ladle into bowls. Sprinkle each with 1 teaspoon minced basil.

Cooking Tip: Don’t have fresh basil? Stir in 2 teaspoons dried basil when you add the garlic powder.

Keep it Healthy: Many canned tomatoes are packed with extra sodium, so be sure to look for the no-salt-added variety.

Tip: Stirring in a touch of baking soda once the soup is off the heat helps reduce the acidity from the tomatoes—a small step that makes a big impact on the soup’s flavor.

Sodium-Smart Recipes

Sodium-Smart Recipes

This digest-sized booklet contains 28 recipes and photographs. It also contains information on how sodium affects overall health, a reference guide for sodium-free flavorings and provides American Heart Association's dietary recommendations. 

   Shop Heart

Copyright © 2018 American Heart Association, Healthy For Good™